Provo Farmers Market celebrates 20th anniversary

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(Brigham Tomco)

More than 140 vendors gathered for another session of the 20th anniversary season of the Provo Farmers Market with fresh produce for Utah Valley residents Saturday, Sept. 3.

The market housed numerous booths owned by farmers, artists and other small businesses hoping to sell their fresh produce, products and art.

“It’s not really about making money as a farmers market; it’s more about what we’re bringing to Provo,” said Provo Farmers Market Executive Director Sara Taylor. “Having all these wonderful vendors that can show their artistry, their food and their farms make it a community space for Provo and for the whole valley.”

One of the vendors, Christina Dineley, commutes roughly an hour and a half from Manti, Utah each Saturday morning to sell her green living products at her booth for her business, The Purple Chameleon. Her inventory includes cold teas, washable cotton rounds and headwear from a variety of different cultures.

“It’s incredible to see how it’s grown. It’s absolutely wonderful. There are some incredible artists out here and it’s fun to see both the farmers and the artists doing their thing,” she said.

Dineley has attended the Provo Farmers Market for the past 12–13 years — since it consisted only of a single row of vendors — and continues to sell her products every Saturday at her booth to this day.

Eagle Mountain, Utah resident Mark Cookson sells his famous gourmet jams at the Provo Market each Saturday and has been doing so for the past four years. Cookson’s booth specializes in pepper jams which include jalapeños, habaneros, ghost peppers and Carolina Reapers.

Cookson also sells non-pepper jams and his famous Spice Plum Jelly that “tastes just like Christmas,” he said. His booth for his business, Jam It Up LLC, can be found every Saturday morning right alongside the other vendors.

Cookson explained that a lot of people who have visited his booth at the Provo Farmers Market are not just from Utah. “It’s really provided us an opportunity to share it with others everywhere all over the country and all over the world.”

Cookson also talked about why people should come to the Provo Farmers Market. “It’s so diverse, and it’s not just farmers — you get everything here,” Cookson said. “If you can’t find it here, it’s probably not at a farmers market.”

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