Computer coding classes offered to prepare students for the future

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It’s no secret that computer programming skills are becoming more relevant with the progression of technology and business. BYU students are aware of the demand for these skills but don’t have the time or class schedule to learn their essentials.

Student Tyler Morgan works on one of his web design projects at Provo Web Academy. The academy offers four-, six- or nine-week programs focusing on the basics of computer languages.
Student Tyler Morgan works on one of his web design projects at Provo Web Academy. The academy offers four-, six- or nine-week programs focusing on the basics of computer languages.

Provo Web Academy, a local business dedicated to teaching the basics of computer programming, is one of the programs that provides students with the opportunity to learn coding skills. Through the use of small class sizes and flexible class schedules, the academy focuses on teaching the basics of popular computer languages such as HTML, CSS, JavaScript and JQuery.

“Classes are in the evenings and on the weekends,” said CEO of Provo Web Academy and BYU graduate Steven Dewey. “This prevents our students from having to drop out of university classes or quit their jobs.”

The goal is to help students become proficient enough to effectively build and manage websites that are both dynamic and responsive, creating programs capable of being viewed on any device.

“We use formative assessments throughout the course to evaluate students’ various web development skills,” said Jared Rhodes, COO of Provo Web Academy. “This includes simulations of real-world working environments and other collaborative and individual learning projects.”

During a nine-week course, students are given the opportunity to work on web development projects for local companies, which helps students to both engage in professional projects and enhance their personal portfolios.

And employers will be looking.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the field of computer programming is expected to increase nearly 30 percent from 2014 to 2020. Meanwhile, all other job growth in the U.S. is expected to grow only 14 percent.

“We prepare our students to pass industry standard certifications,” Rhodes said. “Thus it allows an easy bridge into employment.”

Whether to boost an academic résumé, career or just to keep up with the rest of the world, learning to program is becoming a vital skill to acquire.

For more information on Provo Web Academy, visit provowebacademy.com.