News Briefs Nov. 3, 2015

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The Kansas City Royals win the World Series

Member of the Kansas City Royals celebrates after Game 5 of the Major League Baseball World Series against the New York Mets Monday, Nov. 2, 2015, in New York. The Royals won 7-2 to win the series. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
Member of the Kansas City Royals celebrates after Game 5 of the Major League Baseball World Series against the New York Mets Monday, Nov. 2, 2015, in New York. The Royals won 7-2 to win the series. (Associated Press)

They worked all season to take one more step in the World Series.

Eric Hosmer wouldn’t wait any longer.

A daring dash by Hosmer tied the score in the ninth, and those bound-and-determined Kansas City Royals rallied yet again to beat the New York Mets 7-2 in 12 innings early Monday for their first championship since 1985.

One agonizing win from ecstasy last year, this time the Royals reign after their latest incredible comeback and a go-ahead hit in Game 5 from Christian Colon, maybe the most unlikely player in uniform.

So go ahead and crown ’em, Kansas City! The job is finally done.

 

Suspicious Russian plane crash kills 224 people

In this photo made available Monday, Nov. 2, 2015, and provided by Russian Emergency Situations Ministry, Egyptian Military on cars approach a plane's tail at the wreckage of a passenger jet bound for St. Petersburg in Russia that crashed in Hassana, Egypt, on Sunday, Nov. 1, 2015. The Russian cargo plane on Monday brought the first bodies of Russian victims killed in a plane crash in Egypt home to St. Petersburg, a city awash in grief for its missing residents. (Maxim Grigoriev/Russian Ministry for Emergency Situations via AP)
Egyptian Military on cars approach a plane’s tail at the wreckage of a passenger jet bound for St. Petersburg in Russia that crashed in Hassana, Egypt, on Sunday, Nov. 1, 2015. The Russian cargo plane on Monday brought the first bodies of Russian victims killed in a plane crash in Egypt home to St. Petersburg, a city awash in grief for its missing residents. (Russian Ministry for Emergency Situations via Associated Press)

Only an external impact could have caused a Russian plane to dive into the Egyptian desert, killing all 224 people on board, its Russian operator said Monday, adding to a series of confusing statements from investigators that left unclear why the plane broke up in mid-flight.

The Airbus A321-200 was flying at 31,000 feet over the Sinai Peninsula when it crashed just 23 minutes after taking off from the Egyptian Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh en route to St. Petersburg.

In Washington, James Clapper, the U.S. director of national intelligence, said that while there is no direct evidence of any terrorist involvement yet, it couldn’t be excluded that the plane was brought down by Islamic State extremists in Sinai.

 

In Newark, Obama to call for breaking cycle of incarceration

In this photo taken Oct. 27, 2015, President Barack Obama speaks in Chicago. More than half a million people leave U.S. prisons each year, but with jobs, housing and mental health services scarce, many are soon back behind bars. On Monday, President Barack Obama will call for breaking that cycle of incarceration by helping former inmates successfully re-enter society. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
President Barack Obama speaks in Chicago. More than half a million people leave U.S. prisons each year, but with jobs, housing and mental health services scarce, many are soon back behind bars. On Monday, President Barack Obama will call for breaking that cycle of incarceration by helping former inmates successfully re-enter society. (Associated Press)

More than half a million people leave U.S. prisons each year, but with jobs, housing and mental health services scarce, many are soon back behind bars. On Monday, President Barack Obama will call for breaking that cycle of incarceration by helping former inmates successfully re-enter society.

With his visit to a drug treatment center in Newark, New Jersey, Obama aims to boost his ongoing push for overhauling the criminal justice system. In rare bipartisan fashion, Congress is considering legislation cutting sentences for nonviolent drug offenders, but Obama will seek to force attention to the plight offenders face once they’re finally set free.

 

Turkish President’s political party regains majority in parliamentary election

A supporter of the Justice and Development Party, (AKP), holds a portrait of Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as people celebrate outside the AKP headquarters, in Istanbul, Turkey, late Sunday, Nov. 1, 2015. Turkey's ruling party secured a stunning victory in Sunday's snap parliamentary election, sweeping back into single-party rule only five months after losing it. The preliminary result, reported after nearly 99 percent of votes were counted, would show the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) had won more than 49 percent of the vote and was projected to get 316 seats in parliament, in a stunning victory. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)
A supporter of the Justice and Development Party, (AKP), holds a portrait of Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as people celebrate outside the AKP headquarters, in Istanbul, Turkey, late Sunday, Nov. 1, 2015. Turkey’s ruling party secured a stunning victory in Sunday’s snap parliamentary election, sweeping back into single-party rule only five months after losing it. The preliminary result, reported after nearly 99 percent of votes were counted, would show the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) had won more than 49 percent of the vote and was projected to get 316 seats in parliament, in a stunning victory. (Associated Press)

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday hailed a big victory for his ruling party in the country’s parliamentary election and demanded the world respect the result.

The ruling Justice and Development Party, or AKP, secured a stunning victory in Sunday’s snap parliamentary election, sweeping back into single-party rule only five months after losing it.

With all of the ballots counted early on Monday, the preliminary results showed that the party won more than 49 percent of the votes.

 

Federal jury to settle bitter battle between sweeteners

This Sept. 15, 2011 file photo shows a nutrition label that lists high fructose corn syrup as an ingredient in a can of soda, in Philadelphia. In a trial starting Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015, jurors in the case between sugar processors and corn manufacturers will take up one of nutrition’s most vexing debates and confront a choice common among some consumers: sugar or high fructose corn syrup? (Associated Press)
This Sept. 15, 2011 file photo shows a nutrition label that lists high fructose corn syrup as an ingredient in a can of soda, in Philadelphia. In a trial starting Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015, jurors in the case between sugar processors and corn manufacturers will take up one of nutrition’s most vexing debates and confront a choice common among some consumers: sugar or high fructose corn syrup? (Associated Press)

Big Sugar and Big Corn face off in court this week in a bitter, multibillion-dollar battle of sweeteners that boils down to a mix of science, semantics and marketing.

Jurors in the case between sugar processors and corn manufacturers will take up one of nutrition’s most vexing debates and confront a choice common among some consumers: sugar or high fructose corn syrup?

The trial starting Tuesday in federal court grew out of efforts by the Corn Refiners Association to rebrand its high fructose corn syrup as “corn sugar” to reverse damaging publicity that associated it with diabetes and obesity.

 

 

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