Happily never after?

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As a newlywed, my conversations with friends, co-workers and even strangers involve discussion on how special it is to be at the beginning of marriage and the disappointment to come. Phrases such as, “That’s cute; you’re still in love!” and, “Oh, just you wait for another couple years…” are all too familiar.

I do not believe in an accidentally blissful marriage. The current divorce rates are about 50 percent, according to the APA. I have viewed my own marriage, as well as my parents’ marriage, and can see it requires compromise and a lot of apologizing. But it is possible to have a happily ever after.

Scientific evidence has found successful marriages stem from basic habits, such as saying “we,” staying positive, daily communication and gratitude. Additionally, these practices can have an impact even in small doses. While simple, patterns like these make all the difference.

I encourage us all to see the influence individuals can have on the success of a marriage before the reinforced doubt is set. Marriage has unbelievable potential, and more importantly, that potential can be attained by anyone who is willing to take the simple steps to succeed.

Annie Cassell
Sandy

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