Things you should know today: 7/17/17

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Flash flood kills 5 children, 4 adults at Arizona swim hole

Members of the Tonto Rim Search and Rescue team exit a section of forest after searching along the banks of the East Verde River for victims of a flash flood, Sunday, July 16, 2017, in Payson, Ariz. Search and rescue crews, including 40 people on foot and others in a helicopter, have recovered bodies of children and adults, some as far as two miles down the river after Saturday’s flash flooding poured over a popular swimming area inside the Tonto National Forest in central Arizona. (AP Photo/Ralph Freso)

The group from the Phoenix and Flagstaff areas had met Saturday for a day trip along a popular swimming hole near Payson, about 100 miles (160.9 kilometers) northeast of the capital. They set up lounge chairs not knowing an intense thunderstorm was dumping heavy rainfall just upstream in the Tonto National Forest.
The storm unleashed 6-foot-high floodwaters, dark with ash from a summer wildfire, onto the unsuspecting family and friends. The torrent carried away tree branches and other debris and left a wake of nine bodies.

Health plan hinges on the young, but they’re a tough sell

In this July 12, 2017, photo, Julian Senn-Raemont poses for a portrait in downtown Woodstock, Ill. The 24-year-old writer-musician hasn’t known a world without a health care safety net and hates being forced by law to get coverage. Insurers need young, healthy enrollees like him to keep premiums down for everyone something Republicans building a replacement for the Affordable Care Act have addressed with gap-in-coverage penalties and lower prices for some young adults. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Julian Senn-Raemont isn’t convinced he needs to buy health insurance when he loses coverage under his dad’s plan in a couple of years — no matter what happens in the policy debate in Washington, or how cheap the plans are.
The 24-year-old musician hasn’t known a world without a health care safety net. But he hates being forced by law to get coverage, and doesn’t think he needs it.
“I’m playing the odds,” said Senn-Raemont, who lives in Woodstock, Illinois. He will go without insurance, he said, until he starts a family or gets a job with benefits. “I feel comfortable I could get care if I needed it.”

8 is enough: Federer gets record-breaking Wimbledon title

Switzerland’s Roger Federer celebrates with the trophy after beating Croatia’s Marin Cilic in the Men’s Singles final match on day thirteen at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London Sunday, July 16, 2017 (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)

Capping a marvelous fortnight in which he never dropped a set, Federer won his eighth Wimbledon trophy and 19th Grand Slam championship overall by overwhelming Marin Cilic 6-3, 6-1, 6-4 in merely 1 hour, 41 minutes Sunday.

Hearing is believing: Speech may be a clue to mental decline

In this July 6, 2017 photo, Kim Mueller, left, administers a test to Alan Sweet, where he describes an illustration, as part of a University of Wisconsin-Madison study on dementia. The study found that for some people subtle changes in everyday speech can be correlated with early mild cognitive impairment, which can be a precursor to Alzheimer’s. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)

Your speech may, um, help reveal if you’re uh … developing thinking problems. More pauses, filler words and other verbal changes might be an early sign of mental decline, which can lead to Alzheimer’s disease, a study suggests.

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