Skiers and snowboarders stay fit on and off the slopes

382

Utah is known worldwide for having powdery snow that lends itself well to skiing and snowboarding.  Some BYU students who love to ski and snowboard practically live on the slopes during the wintertime, but when the snow melts and Utah’s mountains are bare, there is no shortage of ways for skiers and snowboarders to stay in shape and enjoy the outdoors.

United States' Sage Kotsenburg takes a jump during the men's  snowboard slopestyle final at the Rosa Khutor Extreme Park, at the 2014 Winter Olympics, Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
United States’ Sage Kotsenburg takes a jump during the men’s snowboard slopestyle final at the Rosa Khutor Extreme Park, at the 2014 Winter Olympics, Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

In order to stay fit for the slopes, it’s important for skiers and snowboarders to focus on their glutes, quads and hamstrings, according to an article by the Wall Street Journal. Cardio exercises are important as well since they facilitate endurance and help skiers and snowboarders prepare for strenuous activity at high altitudes.

Kate Kennington, a senior at BYU from Draper studying history, has been an avid skier for the past 21 years.

 

“I used to [ski] about 40 to 50 days in a season, but lately, being a busy college student, I [ski] about 10 to 15 days a season,” Kennington said. “I love to ski because I feel like I’m conquering something bigger than me.”

When Kennington can’t ski during Utah’s hot summer months, she pursues other activities to stay busy outside.

“I love skiing but am never bored in the summer,” Kennington said. “My favorite outdoor activities in the summertime are rock climbing, sailing, running and hiking. I’ve found that my summer activities keep me in good shape for skiing in the winter.”

Jen Jewell, a fellow skier from Logan who studied recreation management at BYU, spends almost 100 days skiing per season. Jewell said she’s been able to find snow in Utah’s mountains as late as July, but when she’s not strapping on ski boots, she’s typically slipping into a harness instead. Her favorite summer activities are “primarily canyoneering, but also kayaking, backpacking, cycling and climbing.”

BYU skiing and snowboarding enthusiasts pursue a variety of activities to stay active during the summer. Photo courtesy Creative Commons.
BYU skiing and snowboarding enthusiasts pursue a variety of activities to stay active during the summer. Photo courtesy Creative Commons.

Frank Young, 23, from Springville, said he mainly skis at Sundance, which is also where he works as a ski instructor.

“I’ve been skiing ever since I was 10,” Young said. “This past winter I went [skiing] about 80 days,” Young said.

Unlike some skiers who choose intense outdoor activities to replace their favorite winter sport, Young has chosen to slow down his pace for the summer months.

“I’ve started fly fishing this summer,” Young said. Young acknowledged that he hasn’t found a summer sport that he loves as much as skiing, but he feels satisfied waiting for a catch on the banks of Utah’s streams and the shores of Utah’s lakes.

Dave Bennett, a computer science student at BYU from Draper, said he’s mostly a skier but occasionally likes to snowboard.

“I have been skiing for the past 19 years,” Bennett said. “In the past I have had over 100 days of skiing in a single season.”

During the summer, Bennett said he particularly enjoys mountain biking.

“It’s a lot like skiing on dirt,” Bennett said. “I also like longboarding, rock climbing, sailing, scuba diving and backpacking.”

Even with the variety of activities these students participate in to help them stay active before ski and snowboard season, they all said they look forward to hitting the slopes again.

For readers who would like other ideas on ways to stay fit for ski season, skinet.com has more suggestions. 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email