Historic crippling blizzard moves across Midwest

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America’s heartland has been hit with back-to-back snowstorms, each dubbed by the National Weather Service as a “historic, crippling blizzard.”

A man pushes a snowblower around a giant pile of snow left by road crews in the Country Club Plaza shopping district of Kansas City, Mo., Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013.  For the second time in a week, a major winter storm paralyzed parts of the nation's midsection Tuesday, dumping a fresh layer of heavy, wet snow atop cities still choked with piles from the previous system and making travel perilous from the Oklahoma panhandle to the Great Lakes. The weight of the snow strained power lines and cut electricity to more than 100,000 homes and businesses. At least three deaths were blamed on the blizzard. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
A man pushes a snowblower around a giant pile of snow left by road crews in the Country Club Plaza shopping district of Kansas City, Mo., Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013.  (AP Photo)

The storm has passed for most residents of Kansas, Missouri and the Great Plains. At least three deaths resulted from the blizzard, and the side effects of the storm are just starting to be noticed. Downed limbs and telephone poles have knocked power out for over 56,000 people, and the thick, wet snow has made it a problem for those trying to get around. Portions of Interstate 40 in Amarillo, Texas, were closed both ways as a result of “extremely icy conditions,” the Texas Department of Transportation said.

Some people saw the obvious concern and danger posed by the storm, but according to a CNN article others saw the silver lining.

Jim Service of Overland Park, Kansas, spaced out the work of clearing last week’s snowfall over four days. He finished Sunday, just in time for this storm.

After a warm-up session clearing Tuesday’s snow — much wetter and heavier than last week’s — he retreated inside with a Clive Cussler novel and planned to enjoy the day off. Like many others, Service’s company called off work Tuesday at the behest of state officials who warned that the storm was too dangerous for people to be on the roads.

“It’s great for me,” he said.

The storm is expected to blow through by the end of the night for most of the Great Plains. For the full article, go to CNN.com.

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