Videography growing in popularity

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    By CHAUNDRA WILSON

    Almost as traditional as the elaborate white dress is the decorative album filled with photos of bride, groom and parents captured forever with posed postures and rehearsed smiles. The use of professional videography is swiftly becoming part of the wedding day festivities, to capture not only the smile but the action of the important day.

    Eric White, business partner of North by Northwest Video Productions, said video is a unique discipline and not commonly used to replace conventional photography.

    White said the company covered about 200 weddings last year and anticipates a higher demand for their services this year.

    Although relatives and friends will often make home movies of the event, there are options in editing and quality that are unavailable with amateur supplies, equipment and experience.

    “Why not have your best friend as your doctor?” White said, explaining the differences between an amateur and professional videographer.

    According to White, professional video is a more elaborate process and takes a different artistic approach.

    “For every one hour spent shooting, there are four hours spent editing,” White said. “It is like making a mini movie documentary. With a temple wedding, there can be 100 shots of just the temple.”

    Jeni Earl, of Salt Lake City, had her wedding videotaped in May 1999.

    “Videos are not just the candid pictures. You get to see personality,” Earl said. “You hire them to film the two of you, things that your uncle or someone wouldn’t get. He could be occupied with other people there.”

    Michelle James, of West Jordan, was married in March 1991. As a gift, a videographer in her family taped the wedding, and a friend edited the footage.

    “Edited, you can see little parts, 20 minute segments instead of two to three hours of people walking by and looking dumb. You can watch 20 minutes rather than three hours of boredom.”

    Despite the benefits, professional videography can be a significant additional expense, costing between $500 and $2,700.

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