Eye on the Y: Biology professor awarded for her work with bone marrow transplant registry, BYU students advocate for youth mental health at SOPHE summit

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Biology professor awarded for her work with bone marrow transplant registry

Dr. Julianne Grose was named recipient of the 2022 Lives Award by Be the Match (Photo courtesy of Rebekah Baker)

Dr. Julianne Grose, BYU molecular biology professor, won an award for her work with the bone marrow transplant registry.

After Grose’s brother-in-law was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2003 and was left with no match for a transplant, she began working with non-profit group Be the Match to organize classroom and on-campus drives to encourage students to register as potential donors.

Over the past five years, more than 5,000 BYU students have joined the registry. The students registered as possible marrow donors, willing to save a stranger’s life. So far, at least 46 current or former students have been matched with blood cancer patients in need.

BYU students advocate for youth mental health at SOPHE summit

BYU public health students were given the opportunity to advocate for youth mental health alongside federal legislators at Washington DC’s annual Society for Public Health Education conference. (Photo courtesy of Michael Barnes)

Fourteen public health students were given the opportunity to advocate for youth mental health alongside federal legislators at the annual Society for Public Health Education conference in Washington D.C. 

The SOPHE holds their public health advocacy conference every year for professionals and students. This year’s theme was youth mental health equity. This theme consists of topics such as racism, LGBTQ+ issues, mental health and misinformation.

The conference began with two days of preparation in groups organized by states. On the third day, each group presented their findings on how legislation can change to support youth equity directly to their legislators.

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