Good News Thursday: Three friends who have attended every Super Bowl plan their final trip, Holocaust restitution law passed in Latvia

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Three friends who have attended every Super Bowl plan their final trip

From left to right: Tom Henschel, Gregory Eaton, and Don Crisman, are members of the Never Miss a Super Bowl Club. The three friends have attended every game for 55 years, since the first AFL-NFL World Championship took place. (AP News)

Three friends who are members of the Never Miss a Super Bowl Club plan their trip to the big championship game this year, which may be their final one together as a group.

Tom Henschel, Gregory Eaton and Don Crisman have attended every Super Bowl for the last 55 years. Crisman and Henschel first met at the 1983 Super Bowl, and Eaton met them later in the mid-2010s. Their passion for football united them and continues to excite them to make the long trip to the Super Bowl every year.

“I still think I have a few years left. I’m going to try to make it to 60,” Henschel said when reflecting on the planning of future trips to watch the championship. “Bit old man age is catching up to all of us.”

New study sheds light about Neanderthals in Europe

A team of European and American researchers discovered in a cave in Southern France, that Neanderthals and modern humans reached that part of Europe long before researchers originally thought.

On Feb. 9, a paper published by the journal Science Advances described finding fossilized homo sapiens remains and tools among those of Neanderthals in the French cave.

The researchers spent more than 30 years sifting through the layers of dirt of the cave in Marseille, France. Some of the discoveries included stone tools used by homo sapiens to cut or scrape. “The findings provide archaeological evidence that these hominid cousins may have coexisted in the same region of Europe during the same time period,” the team who wrote about the findings said.

Holocaust restitution law passed in Latvia

Latvia’s parliament passed a Holocaust restitution bill on Thursday, Feb. 10, that will compensate Jewish families for their pre-war property losses. This is a big step forward for the Jewish community in Latvia, as it has taken 77 years for the bill to be passed. (AP News)

Latvia’s parliament passed a Holocaust restitution bill on Feb. 10 that will compensate Jewish families for lost Jewish property.

The bill authorizes 40 million euros to be spent to revitalize Latvia’s Jewish community, provide social and material assistance to Holocaust survivors and to fund Jewish schools.

Many other European countries took measures to compensate the families of pre-war Jewish property owners during the decades following the Holocaust. However, it has taken more than seven decades for Latvia to pass the Holocaust restitution law.

“Finalizing this process demonstrates that even 77 years after the end of the Holocaust, it is never too late for justice,” said chairman of the Latvian Council of Jewish Communities Arkady Sukharenko.

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