Highlights from BYU Colleges: Students, professors research pharmacy-prescribed birth control accessibility, algorithm predicts suicidal thoughts and behaviors in adolescents

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College of Life Sciences

BYU public health students and professors studied the effects Utah pharmacists prescribing contraceptives have on women’s health. (College of Life Sciences)

Recent BYU public health graduate Ashley Tanner led a research project on the effects of a standing order that allowed Utah pharmacists to prescribe contraceptives. Tanner worked with public health professors Brianna Magnusson, Chantel Sloan-Aagard and students J.B. Eyring, Sarah Christensen and Emily Pilling. The team discovered how many pharmacies in Utah chose to implement the standing order and saw what types of contraceptives were offered. They concluded that increased accessibility and consistency through pharmacies would allow more women the opportunity to make decisions about their health.

“If we could be open about women’s health, it could make such a big difference in people’s lives — not just with getting the right information but also with not feeling alone and frustrated because nobody else understands,” Tanner said.

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences

BYU computer science professor Quinn Snell, along with researchers from Johns Hopkins University and Harvard University, worked to prevent suicide in adolescents. (BYU Computer Science)

Researchers from BYU, Johns Hopkins University and Harvard University have created an algorithm to predict suicidal thoughts and behaviors in adolescents, which could eventually prevent suicide. The team, consisting of computer science and public health professors, could accurately predict suicidal thoughts or behavior signs in adolescents.

“I’ve had close friends that have had suicides in their family. For me, it’s kind of personal that way,” BYU computer science professor Quinn Snell said.

Marriott School of Business

BYU associate athletic director and alumnus Chad Lewis is continuing his education through the BYU Marriott School of Business. (BYU Marriott School of Business)

BYU associate athletic director and alumnus Chad Lewis has decided to continue his learning by earning his Executive Master in Public Administration at the BYU Marriott School of Business. Lewis can apply football skills such as dividing and taking on responsibility and teamwork to his experience as a graduate student. He believes continuing his education will be rewarding.

“I want to use the skills I’ve learned from each class to be a better person, husband, father, employee and perhaps a future business owner,” Lewis said.

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