News Briefs Sept. 8

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FILE - In this Aug. 10, 2015, file photo, Silverton, Colo., resident Melanie Bergolc walks along the banks of Cement Creek in Silverton, polluted by mine waste runoff. The focus on a toxic mine spill that fouled rivers in three states shifts to Congress the week of Sept. 7 as lawmakers kick off a series of hearings into how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accidentally unleashed the deluge of poisoned water. (Jon Austria/The Daily Times via AP, File) MANDATORY CREDIT
Silverton, Colo., resident Melanie Bergolc walks along the banks of Cement Creek in Silverton, polluted by mine waste runoff. The focus on a toxic mine spill that fouled rivers in three states shifts to Congress the week of Sept. 7 as lawmakers kick off a series of hearings into how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accidentally unleashed the deluge of poisoned water. (Jon Austria/The Daily Times via AP, File)

Congress wades into toxic mine spill caused by EPA

The focus on a toxic mine spill that fouled rivers in three Western states shifts to Congress this week as lawmakers kick off a series of hearings into how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accidentally unleashed the deluge of poisoned water.

Republican committee leaders said EPA officials were frustrating their attempts to investigate the spill by withholding documents that could explain what went wrong when a cleanup team doing excavation work triggered the release.

 

FILE - In a Sept. 17, 2013 file photo, the St. Vrain creek flows past a bridge destroyed in flooding days earlier, in Longmont, Colo. New research shows floods like the one that ransacked northern Colorado in 2013, killing 10 people, might be more common than previously thought, and that could require more homeowners to get flood insurance and trigger more stringent construction rules. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
The St. Vrain creek flows past a bridge destroyed in flooding days earlier, in Longmont, Colo. New research shows floods like the one that ransacked northern Colorado in 2013, killing 10 people, might be more common than previously thought, and that could require more homeowners to get flood insurance and trigger more stringent construction rules. (Associated Press)

Flood zones could expand, raising costs for Colorado

New research shows flood like the one that ransacked northern Colorado two years ago, killing 10 people, might be more common than previously thought – and that could require more homeowners to get flood insurance and trigger more stringent construction rules.

The September 2013 flood caused $3 billion in damage to neighborhoods, highways. farms and oilfields. Nearly 2,000 homes were damaged or destroyed, many in small mountain towns.

 

In this image taken from TV, Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron makes a statement at the House of Commons, London, Monday Sept. 7, 2015. David Cameron says the U.K. will re-settle up to 20,000 Syrian refugees from camps in Turkey, Jordan and Syria over the next five years. (PA via AP) UNITED KINGDOM OUT NO SALES NO ARCHIVE
In this image taken from TV, Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron makes a statement at the House of Commons, London, Monday Sept. 7, 2015. David Cameron says the U.K. will re-settle up to 20,000 Syrian refugees from camps in Turkey, Jordan and Syria over the next five years. (PA via AP)

UK drone strike kills 3 ISIS fighters in Syria

Prime Minister David Cameron revealed Monday that British forces had used a drone strike over Syria in August to kill three islamic State fighters, including two Britons.

He told Parliament that the attack was legally justified because the militants were plotting lethal attacks against Britain and the fighters could not be eliminated any other way.

“There was a terrorist directing murder on our streets and no other means to stop them,” Cameron said.

 

Nevada is home to several military installations and bombing ranges for the U.S. Air Force. The Air Force is offering $5.2 million for a property in Nevada. (Associated Press)

Air Force wants owner to give up NV bomb range site

The U.S. Air Force is giving an ultimatum to owners of a remote Nevada property now surrounded by a vast bombing range including the super-secret Area 51: Take a $5.2 million “last best offer” by Thursday for their property, or the government will seize it.

The answer: No, at least for now. The owners, who trace their mining and mineral claims to the 1870s, include descendants of a couple who lost their hardscrabble mining enterprise after the Air Force moved in the 1940s.

 

Migrants and refugees wait to be registered by police at the port of Mytilene, on the Greek island of Lesbos, early Sunday, Sept. 6, 2015. (AP Photo/Santi Palacios)
Migrants and refugees wait to be registered by police at the port of Mytilene, on the Greek island of Lesbos, early Sunday, Sept. 6, 2015. (AP Photo/Santi Palacios)

Greek island overwhelmed by stranded migrants

After perilous sea voyages from neighboring Turkey, thousands of migrants have been stranded on the Greek island of Lesbos for days, some for nearly two weeks, running out of money and desperate to get to mainland Greece and continue on their route.

The island of some 100,000 residents has been transformed by the sudden new population of some 20,000 refugees and migrants, mostly from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan – and the strain is pushing everyone to the limit.

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