Eye on the Y: BYU makeup department, Emergency Medical Services partner together for mass casualty simulation, DancEnsemble showcases the work of student choreographers

170

BYU makeup department, Emergency Medical Services partner together for mass casualty simulation

175 volunteers gathered from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m to decorate students in tear stains, red eyes, third degree burns, compound fractures, and other injuries. The student volunteers participated in BYU’s mock mass casualty simulation. (Photo courtesy of Madi Segwick)

Many volunteers gathered together on Nov. 12 to decorate students in tear stains, red eyes, third degree burns, compound fractures and other injuries. The student volunteers participated in BYU’s mock mass casualty simulation

The collaboration between BYU EMS, the college of nursing, the campus police department and the Theatre and Media Arts department gives an opportunity for students to prepare for any potential disaster on campus. 

Each semester, students all over campus volunteer to act as victims in the scenario. Past events range from an earthquake at the Missionary Training Center and the Maeser building to chemical explosions in the Benson building. 

This year, EMS students chose to prepare for the scenario of a building collapse and a fire taking place in the HFAC. Participating in the simulation gives students the opportunity to get experience and be involved in the BYU experience as well as learn the methods of emergency preparedness.

DancEnsemble showcases the work of student choreographers

BYU contemporary dance group, DancEnsemble, will perform the work of choreographer Alexandra Bradshaw-Yerby and seven other student choreographers on Nov. 18 and 19. (Photo courtesy of DancEnsemble)

BYU contemporary dance group, DancEnsemble, will perform the work of choreographer Alexandra Bradshaw-Yerby and seven other student choreographers on Nov. 18 and 19. 

The contemporary dance group is a student-oriented dance company that mentors and produces student choreography. Each dance piece is created with an underlying theme. The themes of each performance range from the 1930s to hope and peace. Student choreographer Sarah Dalley chose to model her performance after the contrast between isolation and connectedness.

“Through their individual expression and artistry, the dancers share themselves and their stories in the piece as well,” Dalley said. “When the audience sees it, I hope they can connect their own experiences to what they see and feel inspired or learn something new.”

The performance will end with a dance inspired by President Kevin J Worthen’s address to 2022 graduates titled “The Propinquity Effect.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email