Art exhibit highlights Latter-day Saint food dishes

405

Daniel George’s first Salt Lake City exhibit called “Marrow” features art that looks into common food dishes from members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints throughout the state of Utah.

“He’s kind of exploring the cultural heritage of LDS culture through the lens of food and specifically photographing that food,” said Meaghan Whalen, a Utah Museum of Contemporary Art intern.

George is recreating and photographing multiple food dishes from different ward cookbooks and displaying the food as a folk art.

The art exhibit is being displayed in downtown Salt Lake City which suggests that the audience is mostly from Utah and the frequent visitors are pretty familiar with the food and the exhibit overall.

“I do get a lot less questions about that exhibit than most of our other shows going on,” Whalen said.

This does not necessarily mean that all visitors of the museum are local. 

“No, no, we just were walking by and saw it, and we’re people who like art,” museum visitor Sharon Coatney said.

A couple of out-of-state visitors walking by in-between sessions of their conference in downtown Salt Lake saw the museum and decided to stop by and check it out.

“It looks like Baptist potluck dinner day,” Coatney said.

Museum visitor Deb Levitov is a Baptist from Lincoln, Nebraska who saw lots of familiar dishes used during their monthly potluck dinners. “When we saw the picture that said funeral potatoes, it made us laugh because we had never heard it called that before,” she said.

Many of these stereotypical recipes capture the values, cultures and traditions of those living in the Western region of the United States which is sometimes known as the “Mormon Corridor” or the “Jell-o Belt.”

“Everything looked pretty familiar, so it was a fun exhibit to walk around and look at,” Levitov said.

George’s art exhibit closes on Oct. 23, so make sure to head on over and check out his photos before then. To find out more information about the exhibit or about the museum, go to www.utahmoca.org.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email