Highlights from BYU colleges: College of Life Sciences welcomes new professor, business school offers finance recruitment prep class

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College of Life Sciences

The Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences welcomed new associate professor April Hulet last month. (College of Life Sciences)

The Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences welcomed new associate professor April Hulet last month. Hulet’s areas of expertise include rangeland, restoration and fire ecology, as well as remote sensing and geographic information systems. Her areas of study mainly include ensuring that lands are resilient before and after disturbances occur.

“I love that there are a lot of challenges, but along with those challenges there are a lot of opportunities to learn about what’s happening out there and how to be good stewards,” Hulet said.

Marriott School of Business

BYU’s finance department is offering a class to help students learn skills needed to connect with recruiters. (BYU Photo)

Recruiters come to the BYU Marriott School of Business every fall hoping to find new interns and future hires. To help students prepare for this, the Department of Finance offers a recruitment prep class, where students learn about different finance fields and skills needed to connect with recruiters. Tracie Laham Jones, BYU Marriott School finance career advisor, believes connecting with recruiters is important because these careers are built on college internships.

“An internship is a test period for both the student and the company. A summer internship is a low-risk way to see if the situation is a good fit for both the student and the employer,” Jones said.

College of Family, Home and Social Sciences

BYU associate professor of family life Jocelyn Wilkes teaches that dinnertime placement affects family life. (College of Family, Home and Social Sciences)

Recent studies show that the time dinner is eaten affects family life and daily productivity. The American Time Use Survey determined that the optimal dinner time is 6:15 p.m., leaving time for more family activities. BYU family life professor Jocelyn Wikle teaches that this family dinner time is when parents are not being spread thin and can give more attention to their children, which in turn improves their learning and social capacities, including behavioral problems.

“The act of dinner actually helps us shift into different activities than we were focused on before dinner. It signals a transition from the day-time schedule of work, school and activities to evening leisure and togetherness,” Wikle said.

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