Nostalgia during COVID-19 quarantine

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When quarantine started back in March, many people rediscovered entertainment they loved when they were younger. 

“Honestly, I just felt like I was in 7th grade again hanging out with my friends,” said Brigham Young University student Olivia Carver. 

They couldn’t go to movies, parties or even sporting events, so Carver and her roommates had to step back in time in order to pass it. 

“We pulled out the GameCube and played some Mario Kart, and we also found ‘Just Dance’ again and started playing ‘Just Dance’ so we’d stay inside and be active,” said Carver. 

With all the uncertainty surrounding the coronavirus, people wanted to feel comforted. They wanted a sense of security. 

Kristen Vellinga decided to reread a book series she’d found in high school.

“It’s a fantasy series, so it had the added element of not being related to anything that was happening in the real world, and so there’s the escapist nature of that, and then also the comfort level that I knew what was going to happen, I knew there would be a happy ending, I knew that I would like what happened,” she said. 

People played board games, old video games or reignited their childhood passions. 

“I spent an hour and a half at least every single day playing Mario Kart,” said Josh Orton. 

“Harry Potter,” “Hannah Montana,” “Twilight” and “Avatar: The Last Airbender” are just a few examples of nostalgic things that have gained traction again. 

“You’re with people that you maybe haven’t been with since you were a lot younger, and so I was with my family altogether trapped in a house, and all the freedoms we experienced when we got older, like being able to drive over to a friend’s house, were very much limited to the point where we were like little kids again with our parents,” said Orton.  

Andrew Koster spent a lot of time at home doing puzzles with his family. “People have had so much time that they’re not used to, so they just get a lot of time to reflect and look back on their lives and what they did that was fun, what they enjoyed, and kind of relive those moments,” he said. 

“People really had to focus on the past and things they experienced when the world was normal, and so nostalgia plays a big role in that because they were missing what life used to be like,” said Tehani Travis, a college student that also returned home to her family once COVID-19 hit. 

It shows that people can find ways to cope with the uncertainty of the world even in the darkest of times, but in this case, they had to look back in order to move forward. 

When quarantine started back in March, many people rediscovered entertainment they loved when they were younger. 

“Honestly, I just felt like I was in 7th grade again hanging out with my friends,” said Brigham Young University student Olivia Carver. 

They couldn’t go to movies, parties or even sporting events, so Carver and her roommates had to step back in time in order to pass it. 

“We pulled out the GameCube and played some Mario Kart, and we also found ‘Just Dance’ again and started playing ‘Just Dance’ so we’d stay inside and be active,” said Carver. 

With all the uncertainty surrounding the coronavirus, people wanted to feel comforted. They wanted a sense of security. 

Kristen Vellinga decided to reread a book series she’d found in high school.

“It’s a fantasy series, so it had the added element of not being related to anything that was happening in the real world, and so there’s the escapist nature of that, and then also the comfort level that I knew what was going to happen, I knew there would be a happy ending, I knew that I would like what happened,” she said. 

People played board games, old video games or reignited their childhood passions. 

“I spent an hour and a half at least every single day playing Mario Kart,” said Josh Orton. 

“Harry Potter,” “Hannah Montana,” “Twilight” and “Avatar: The Last Airbender” are just a few examples of nostalgic things that have gained traction again. 

“You’re with people that you maybe haven’t been with since you were a lot younger, and so I was with my family altogether trapped in a house, and all the freedoms we experienced when we got older, like being able to drive over to a friend’s house, were very much limited to the point where we were like little kids again with our parents,” said Orton.  

Andrew Koster spent a lot of time at home doing puzzles with his family. “People have had so much time that they’re not used to, so they just get a lot of time to reflect and look back on their lives and what they did that was fun, what they enjoyed, and kind of relive those moments,” he said. 

“People really had to focus on the past and things they experienced when the world was normal, and so nostalgia plays a big role in that because they were missing what life used to be like,” said Tehani Travis, a college student that also returned home to her family once COVID-19 hit. 

It shows that people can find ways to cope with the uncertainty of the world even in the darkest of times, but in this case, they had to look back in order to move forward. 

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