Church leaders encourage women to turn to the Savior during General Women’s Session

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Church leaders discussed how to prepare in faith for the coming of the Savior, create unity and persevere through current trials at the General Women’s Session of General Conference Oct. 3.

Sister Bonnie H. Cordon, Young Women general president, conducts the General Women’s Session of the 190th Semiannual General Conference. (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints)

President Russell M. Nelson discussed different ways to prepare for the Savior. He advised women of the church to create places of security at home, learn by faith and never stop preparing in the face of adversity.

A place of security is anywhere individuals can feel the Holy Ghost and be guided by Him, President Nelson said. In addition to the home, the temple is “a place of security unlike any other.”

On learning by faith, President Nelson said members should rely on Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ. “Life without God is a life filled with fear. Life with God is a life filled with peace.”

He encouraged the women of the Church to push forward and continue serving others as they have demonstrated during the pandemic. “The adversary never stops attacking. So, we can never stop preparing!”

“My dear sisters, let us not just endure this current season. Let us embrace the future with faith! Turbulent times are opportunities for us to thrive spiritually. They are times when our influence can be much more penetrating than in calmer times,” President Nelson said.

President Henry B. Eyring, second counselor in the First Presidency of the Church, encouraged women to create unity like in the city of Enoch as they prepare for the Savior’s coming.

“My experience has taught me that Heavenly Father’s daughters have a gift to allay
contention and to promote righteousness with their love of God and with the love of God they engender in those they serve,” President Eyring said.

Sister Sharon Eubank, first counselor in the Relief Society General Presidency, discussed how rowing teams create “swing” by rowing in unison. To do this, rowers must act as individuals while also reigning in their independence. Sister Eubank compared this to creating a union of feeling to receive power from God.

“The women of this Church have unlimited potential to change society. I have full spiritual confidence that, as we seek union of feeling, we will call down the power of God to make our efforts more whole,” Sister Eubank said.

President Russell M. Nelson spoke at the General Women’s Session of the 190th Semiannual General Conference. He discussed different ways to prepare for the Savior in his talk. (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints)

On persevering through today’s trials, President Dallin H. Oaks, first counselor in the First Presidency of the Church, discussed how reminders to “be of good cheer” in the scriptures and Church history apply to members today.

While some trials are collective, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, others are more personal, President Oaks said. He advised the women of the church to turn to Jesus Christ during these times. “There is boundless power in the doctrine of the restored gospel of Jesus Christ. Our unshakeable faith in that doctrine guides our steps and gives us joy.”

Christina B. Franco, second counselor in the Primary General Presidency, also talked about relying on the Savior during trials. She told a story of a piano that broke during delivery. “Sisters and brothers, aren’t we all like this piano, a little broken, cracked, and damaged, feeling like we will never be the same again?”

Sister Franco reminded Church members that the Savior can heal their brokenness and help carry their burdens.

Sister Rebecca M. Craven, second counselor of the Young Women General Presidency, also talked about how the Savior can heal by enabling change. Sister Craven said while people are in the Lord’s debt, they can give Him their change, such as a change in thought, habit or direction. She also encouraged members to help others who may have fallen on their journey down the covenant path.

“Enduring to the end means changing to the end,” she said.

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