Highlights from BYU colleges

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College of Fine Arts and Communications

Raymond E. Beckham is being honored with the Pillar of the Valley award. (The Beckham Family)

BYU alumnus and emeritus professor Raymond E. Beckham will be honored with the Pillar of the Valley Award. Beckham, who died in November 2017, funded the Marriott Center, LaVell Edwards Stadium and the Museum of Art. Beckham later became a professor of public relations, marketing and communications before becoming the dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications. The Pillar of the Valley Award honors educators who have improved Utah Valley.

“The MINORS” tells the story of three brothers who want their grandfather to join their band. (Robert Machoian Graham)

BYU photography professor Robert Machoian Graham’s short film “The MINORS” has been accepted to premiere at the Sundance Film Festival. The festival accepts less than one percent of submitted films, and this is Graham’s third accepted film in less than a decade. “The MINORS” tells the story of young boys who want their grandfather to join a band with them and explores the idea that everyone can chase their dreams regardless of age. “The MINORS” will show four times during the Sundance Film Festival, with one showing in Salt Lake and three showings in Park City. Click here for ticket information.


Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering

The teams gather around their prototypes at the end of the competition. (Chris Bright)

BYU recently held the engineering and entrepreneurial Prototype-a-palooza contest. Six teams had 32 hours to use basic materials to create a prototype for ideas previously developed during the “big ideas” category of the competition. Local businesses sponsored the event and donated prizes such as legal consultations and tech conference tickets. Prototypes included agricultural domes, watches that charge phones and toy steamers.


Marriott School of Business

Will the Trump Administration’s new pharmaceutical requirement improve drug prices? A new study set out to find the answer. (Photo Illustration by BYU Photo)

A study co-authored by accounting professor Bill Tayler states that putting prices on prescription bottles may not be effective in lowering medication prices. It may also dissuade buyers from purchasing the medications they need, as the cost without insurance may be misleading. The Trump Administration headed the policy with hopes of lowering the prices of pharmaceutical drugs. However, the study found that “price disclosure in drug ads works only under the ‘tell the price, only the price, nothing but the price’ scenario,” according to co-author Ge Bai. Tayler said he believes the policy is unlikely to do harm but will do little to control pharmaceutical prices.

Click the buttons below to go to each of the colleges news page, or see University news here.

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