Things you should know today: 4/17/18

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Trump, Abe to meet despite strain over North Korea, tariffs

Pablo Martinez Monsivais
FILE – In this Feb. 10, 2017, file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump, right, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe stand on stage together at the conclusion of their joint news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Abe is heading to Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort Tuesday, April 17, 2018 for two days of talks, hoping to keep Japan’s interests on the table in a possible U.S.-North Korea summit as well as stem a slide in his voter support ratings. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

President Donald Trump is playing host to Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe this week amid growing strain between the countries over the president’s planned meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and the push for new tariffs.

Defending Trump in Russia probe? It’s hardly a dream job

Steve Helber
FILE – In this Oct. 23, 2015, file photo, Jay Sekulow speaks at Regent University in Virginia Beach, Va. Lawyers who have been asked to help represent President Donald Trump have spurned the assignment at least partly out of concerns he wouldn’t pay his bills and doesn’t listen to legal advice. That’s according to several people familiar with the conversations who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity to discuss confidential client matters. The Trump legal team is led by Sekulow, a conservative lawyer and radio talk show host with deep experience in constitutional law and in arguing religious liberty cases before the Supreme Court. He believes that experience is essential and that the case against Trump turns on core constitutional, rather than criminal, questions. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

Several prominent lawyers asked to help represent President Donald Trump in the last year have spurned the assignment at least partly out of concerns he wouldn’t pay his bills and doesn’t listen to legal advice, according to people familiar with the conversations.

California city approves ordinance against sanctuary policy

Haven Daley
FILE – In this April 14, 2017, file photo, protesters rally outside a courthouse where a federal judge heard arguments in the first lawsuit challenging President Donald Trump’s executive order to withhold funding from communities that limit cooperation with immigration authorities in San Francisco. U.S. District Judge William Orrick on Monday, March 5, 2018, rejected the state’s request for a preliminary injunction to turn over the money. More local governments in California are resisting the state’s efforts to resist the Trump administration’s immigration crackdown, and political experts see politics at play as Republicans try to fire up voters in a state where the GOP has grown weak. (AP Photo/Haven Daley, File)The conservative backlash against California’s so-called sanctuary law has taken the form of lawsuits and public tongue-lashings.

The conservative backlash against California’s so-called sanctuary law has taken the form of lawsuits and public tongue-lashings.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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