The perfect answer to the “why social work?” career question

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Lately, I’ve been very stressed out by my career plans. Or, more accurately, my lack of direction. I’m not a freshman anymore, and I still don’t know exactly what I want to do with my life. My parents are pressuring me to make a decision and choose a lucrative career, and all my friends already seem to know what it is they want to do.

I’ve been thinking a bit about social work, but my parents don’t seem thrilled by that idea. They’re afraid I won’t make enough money. What should I do? Should I try to convince my parents that my social work idea is a good one? Should I look into other options? Help!

It sounds like you’re juggling a lot of different concerns! Let’s tackle them one at a time. First, we’ll talk a bit about social work. Then, we’ll take a look at your career options more broadly, and discuss how you might be able to choose an option that will truly make you happy.

Social work is one of the most immensely rewarding careers in the workforce. Preparing for a career in social work might involve undergraduate certificates, as well as higher level degrees, according to experts offering a doctor of social work online. It’s not the easiest career to prepare for, nor is it always the smoothest to handle day-to-day. However, a great deal of the way the job treats you depends on which area of social work you choose.

It’s true enough that social work is not the most lucrative profession on the planet, but that opinion is relative from one person to another. However, its reputation for low wages is not entirely entirely accurate. In fact, Social workers make an average of more than $47,500 per year. That’s enough to live on and be comfortable for many people. And, as most social workers will tell you, it’s the mission, not the money, that keeps them coming back to work day after day. That is a great attitude to have, because studies show that enjoying your job can make you happier. While having more money can, too, there’s a limit to how much you can make before additional income doesn’t improve your happiness anymore. A balanced and purposeful life, not a fat checking account, is what makes happiness and fulfilment!

So, if you love social work, and want to make your career in it, your parents should make their peace with it and support you. You can present them with the information laid out here in the hopes that they come to understand. However, ultimately, it’s your life to live–not theirs!
From your letter, it’s not completely clear whether you have settled on social work as your career. There are a lot of great reasons to choose it, but you can still consider other options. You don’t need to have every aspect of your career planned out already! The average person changes jobs 10 to 15 times in their career, and many change careers entirely. To figure out where to go next, you may want to speak with academic and career advisors on your campus. Career counselors on and off campus are a wonderful resource for those of us who are struggling to decide what to do with our lives. Don’t be afraid to seek professional help in choosing your profession!