Little-known hidden hikes abound in Utah

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BYU students don’t have to be limited to just hiking Y Mountain or Bridal Veil Falls. The following ‘hidden hikes’ in Utah are sure to provide adventure this summer.

The trail head to Rocky Mouth Falls in Sandy. This 0.5 mile hike start in between two houses and leads you to a waterfall. (Emily Sorensen)
The trail head to Rocky Mouth Falls in Sandy. This 0.5 mile hike start in between two houses and leads you to a waterfall. (Emily Sorensen)

Rocky Mouth Falls is rated as an easy hike and is the perfect destination for an afternoon picnic with some friends. The trail head starts between two houses and continues for a little less than half a mile. It is almost like walking into another world because one minute you’re overlooking Utah Valley and the next you’re surrounded by lush greenery.

While the hike is short, some make it a destination to go rock climbing up the waterfall while others simply enjoy a nice picnic by the stream.Once at the top, the waterfall has enough power behind it to lightly mist your face while taking pictures.

“It’s a short, nice hike,” Kessa Burton said. “You feel like you’re in a different world even though you’re just a half mile from houses. It’s a perfect, quick getaway”

Rocky Mouth Falls. This spot is great for rock climbing or simply enjoying a picnic. (Emily Sorensen)
Rocky Mouth Falls. This spot is great for rock climbing or simply enjoying a picnic. (Emily Sorensen)

To get there, continue south for three miles after reaching the intersection of 9400 South and Wasatch Blvd in Sandy. Look for the LDS church on the right and park just south of it. Make your way up the stairs from the parking lot and look for the trail head between two houses.

Kolob Canyon. There are many hikes to do here, but one of particular interest in Taylor Creek Trail. (Emily Sorensen)
Kolob Canyon. There are many hikes to do here, but one of particular interest in Taylor Creek Trail. (Emily Sorensen)

Kolob Canyon is another must for this summer’s bucket list. While there are many hikes in Kolob Canyon to explore, Taylor Creek Trail is definitely one to experience. The trail goes through a narrow canyon with 1,700 foot walls on either side, ultimately leading to the Double Arch Alcove.

The trail leading to the alcove criss-crosses along Taylor Creek.

The hike is five miles round-trip and can be found by taking the Kolob Canyon Road exit in Cedar City. Continue on this road for just over two miles. The parking lot and start of the trail is off to the left.

Hidden Canyon in Zion’s National Park is a hike unlike all the others in the park. It is 3.3 miles round-trip and is rated as a strenuous hike, but the views might just make the hike worth it.

Loren Holyoak
Hidden Canyon in Zion’s National Park. Get off at the Weeping Rock stop and follow the signs to the trail head. (Loren Holyoak)

The trail starts off with switchbacks leading to the entrance of the canyon. This hike is perfect to do even in the middle of the day because the trail is relatively inside the canyon.

After climbing and going around the cliff base while holding onto chains, the trail opens up to ponds and rocks covered in moss and ferns.

After reaching the end of the main trail, there is a sign that says “End of main trail, scrambling is required.” Continue about half a mile past this sign in order to reach an arch.

This hike is one of the favorites of Ranger Loren Holyoak at Zion’s National Park.

Loren Holyoak
The arch in Hidden Canyon. Continue .6 miles past the sign at the top of the main trail. (Loren Holyoak)

“There’s not a lot of people there and it’s a cooler hike” Holyoak said. “It’s super shady and nice and breezy. It’s a different part of Zion that people don’t know about.”

To hike this trail, head to Zion’s National Park and take the shuttle to the Weeping Rock stop. Follow the signs to the Hidden Canyon trail head.

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