And the Academy Award goes to…

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The 2016 Academy Awards brought viewers from around the world to watch the presentation of the Oscars.

Host Chris Rock speaks at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 28, 2016, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)
Host Chris Rock speaks at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 28, 2016, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Associated Press)

This year, BYU students and faculty share before and after thoughts about the nominees and winners.

A controversy about diversity came with the 2016 Academy Awards when there were no black nominees. This fact did not go unnoticed throughout the program.

Chris Rock, the host of the Oscars, began the program with his monologue stating there were “no black nominees.”

“If they nominated hosts, I wouldn’t even have gotten this job,” Rock mockingly announced in his opening monologue. Rock further mentioned the changes that needed to be made in the Academy Award nomination process.

BYU student Spencer Plewe was excited to watch the 2016 Oscars.

“I am more excited about this one because Chris Rock is the host and I think he will be more entertaining,” Plewe said.

Brie Larson, best actress winner for "Room," left, and Alicia Vikander, winner of the best supporting actress award for "The Danish Girl," congratulate each other on stage at the conclusion of the show at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 28, 2016, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)
Brie Larson, best actress winner for “Room,” left, and Alicia Vikander, winner of the best supporting actress award for “The Danish Girl,” congratulate each other on stage at the conclusion of the show. (Associated Press)

Chris Rock hosted the awards and jokingly shared thoughts about the controversy throughout the show.

BYU student Maddy Sharp said she wasn’t too surprised by the racial comments.

“I kind of expected those comments,” Sharp said. “If not from Chris Rock at the Oscars, then from other people in the media later.”

Though some expected the comments, Plewe didn’t.

“Chris Rock did have a few funny moments,” he said. “I was particularly bugged at his constant rebuttals and even jokes towards the ‘OscarsSoWhite’ protestors.”

Aside from the controversy, BYU viewers have other reasons for tuning into the Academy Awards. BYU media arts Professor Scott Christopherson shared inside thoughts about the documentary portion of the academy awards.

Christopherson directed a documentary entitled “Peace Officer.” This documentary was one of the 120 documentaries eligible to be nominated for a 2016 Academy Award.

“In the past, (the Oscars) didn’t interest me as much. It has this year because I am a filmmaker,” Christopherson said.

Though Christopherson’s film wasn’t nominated for the 2016 Academy Awards, he was still excited for the other nominees.

Margot Robbie, Damian Martin, Lesley Vanderwalt, Elka Wardega, Jared Leto
Margot Robbie, left, and Jared Leto, right, pose in the press room with Damian Martin, from left, Lesley Vanderwalt and Elka Wardega, winners of the award for best makeup and hairstyling for “Mad Max: Fury Road.” (Associated Press)

Aside from the actual awards, the red carpet fashion may be just as exciting. Sharp enjoys watching for the best-dressed celebrities.

“I like to see all the dresses and I know my mom and I like to see the same couples every year and if they are still together,” Sharp said.

After viewing the 2016 red carpet pre-show, Sharp said, “I thought Lady Gaga’s outfit was ugly. I just liked the dresses. Jennifer Lawrence looked really pretty, loved her dress. Also, I loved seeing Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio together on the red carpet, it was like the Titanic all over again.”

Leonardo DiCaprio was not only seen on the red carpet but also on the stage with an Oscar in hand for “Best Actor in a Leading Role” for his part in the movie “The Revenant.”

Leonardo DiCaprio received his first Oscar and fans were excited.

“I was so happy that he finally won,” Sharp said.

Regardless of the results, BYU students and faculty share a respect for the Academy Award nominees, though the process can be viewed as subjective.

Mark Ruffalo reacts in the audience after "Spotlight" won the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 28, 2016, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)
Mark Ruffalo reacts in the audience after “Spotlight” won the award for best picture. (Associated Press)

“They are big awards but the award doesn’t tell all. I would say that the process for the Oscars is subjective,” Christopherson said. “I do think that to be able to get nominated you have to have made a really great film.”

Other students feel there may be no way around the subjectivity in the movie industry.

“I think that no matter what they do it can be pretty subjective. Movies are just kind of a subjective thing, people have different tastes and different interests and styles,” Sharp said.

A list of the 2016 Academy Award winners is as follows:

  • Best Picture: Spotlight
  • Actor In A Leading Role: Leonardo DiCaprio “The Revenant”
  • Actress In A Leading Role: Brie Larson “Room”
  • Actor In A Supporting Role: Mark Rylance “Bridge of Spies”
  • Actress In A Supporting Role: Alicia Vikander “The Danish Girl”
  • Animated Feature Film: “Inside Out”
  • Cinematography: “The Revenant”
  • Costume Design: “Mad Max: Fury Road”
  • Directing: Alejandro G. Iñárritu “The Revenant”
  • Documentary Feature: “Amy”
  • Documentary (Short Film): “A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness”
  • Film Editing: “Mad Max: Fury Road”
  • Foreign Language Film: “Son of Saul”
  • Makeup And Hairstyling: “Mad Max: Fury Road”
  • Music (Original Score): “The Hateful Eight”
  • Production Design: “Mad Max: Fury Road”
  • Short Film (Animated): “Bear Story”
  • Short Film (Live Action): “Stutterer”
  • Sound Editing: “Mad Max: Fury Road”
  • Sound Mixing: “Mad Max: Fury Road”
  • Visual Effects: “Ex Machina”
  • Writing (adapted Screenplay): “The Big Short”
  • Writing (Original Screenplay): “Spotlight”
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