Invested Utahns weigh in on same-sex marriage ruling

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Invested Utahns who have been engaged in the same-sex marriage battle are starting to weigh in on Friday’s Supreme Court ruling that makes the right for same-sex couples to marry the law of the land.

Interns run behind a line of security outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015, to reveal the court's decision declaring that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Interns run behind a line of security outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, June 26, 2015, to deliver copies of the court’s decision declaring that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the U.S. (AP Photo)

Lynn Wardle, professor of law at BYU’s J. Reuben Clark Law School and a leading voice on same-sex marriage, was “very, very disappointed.” According to Wardle, who spoke with The Universe shortly after the ruling was released, said the Supreme Court is the last branch of government that should be making a decision on same-sex marriage. “This is an illegitimate and unconstitutional ruling.”

According to Chief Justice John Roberts in a dissent, the decision was not backed by the Constitution or any of its amendments. Wardle believes several of the Supreme Court justices are committed to doing the politically correct thing but lean away from fundamentalist values.

“A host of religious liberty issues are going to erupt,” Wardle said. “There will be an undermine of religious issues of individuals.” Wardle referenced several previous rulings regarding bakers and florists who have been sued for refusing to work for weddings where gay and lesbian couples are married. “The gays are going to force religious individuals to lose religious liberties.”

Derek Kitchen is a leading activist for same-sex marriage. Kitchen and his husband, Moudi Sbeity, were involved in the case that allowed for same-sex marriage in Utah.

“I’m grateful that I’ve been able to play a part in this,” Kitchen said. He explained that this decision would have ramifications for generations to come. Kitchen is also excited that LGBT youths will have a future where they do not have to worry about their rights.

When asked what Kitchen will do after this ruling, he said he will “celebrate with friends and community both locally and in spirit with those who live in states that, up until today, did not have access to marriage.”

William C. Duncan, director of the Center for Family and Society at the Sutherland Institute, said in a statement that children deserve to have a father and mother. The institution is dedicated to promoting freedom in Utah.

“The Court’s decision reflects a growing opinion among government and other elites that adult interest should be prioritized over those of children,” Duncan said.

See also: Supreme Court extends same-sex marriage nationwide

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