No plans for future fashion changes in BYU dress code

600
The BYU band, whose members dazzle in their new, embellished uniforms, stand for its official 1909 photo. (Special Collections)
The BYU band, whose members dazzle in their new, embellished uniforms, stand for its official 1909 photo. (Special Collections)

Leggings, beards and short skirts had better beware, because there is no room for them on the BYU campus.

The Dress and Grooming Standards at BYU are part of the University’s Honor Code. Students, faculty and visitors of BYU campus are expected to abide by the standards laid out in the Honor Code. Students personally sign the Honor Code and promise to abide by its standards upon acceptance into the university.

An advisory council made up of students originally discussed and set up policies and rules that are currently in the Dress and Grooming standards of the Honor Code.

Students have recently called for a change to the grooming standards. Although one group of students is pushing for beards on campus, they shouldn’t throw their razors away yet. Changes to the Honor Code require approval from the university’s board of trustees.

The student movement called “Biking for Beards” took action to bring beards to campus earlier this semester. A group of students sent around a petition for people to sign to show the university that people believe in a beard movement. A student advisory council discusses all matters concerning students and policies, and according to university spokesperson Carri Jenkins, the beard issue has not been brought up.

BYU students originally made the “no beards allowed” rule, and the university plans to keep the policy until further notice.

BYU students have always been expected to abide by the Honor Code. In the 1960s, mirrors were placed around campus as a reminder to students to dress and behave in accordance with BYU standards. (Special Collections)
BYU students have always been expected to abide by the Honor Code. In the 1960s, mirrors were placed around campus as a reminder to students to dress and behave in accordance with BYU standards. (Special Collections)

Jenkins hopes BYU students strive to live the Honor Code with the same enthusiasm and commitment they had when they first came to the university.

“We understand that not everyone may agree with all of the principles in the Honor Code,” Jenkins said. “This is why we are very open about them. We encourage students to work with the Student Advisory Council to discuss ideas and proposals.”

Jenkins also encouraged students to remember their personal integrity because the Honor Code and Dress and Grooming Standards will impact them after their time at BYU.

Jodi Cowen, director of University Career Services, has seen firsthand how positively the Dress and Grooming Standards impact students in their work with future employers.

“Employers have consistently commented on our student presentation,” Cowen said. “How we dress and behave communicates a great deal about ourselves.”

Other BYU students have no qualms with the Honor Code and the Dress and Grooming Standards. They appreciate the environment created by the standards.

“I don’t understand why people oppose it when they agreed to it when they got in,” said Nea Hughes, a BYU student studying elementary education. “It’s nice to walk around and see how everyone respects themselves because it’s evident in how they dress.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email