BLM removing two dinosaur tracks in Moab

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This undated photo provided by the Bureau of Land Management shows theropod tracks found north of Moab, Utah. These tracks were left by large, three-toed, meat-eating dinosaurs, closely related to the new dinosaur Siats. A dry wash full of 112-million-year-old dinosaur tracks are set to be opened to the public this fall near Moab. (AP Photo/The Bureau of Land Management)
This undated photo provided by the Bureau of Land Management shows theropod tracks found north of Moab, Utah. (AP Photo/The Bureau of Land Management)

SALT LAKE CITY — Bureau of Land Management workers are removing two dinosaur tracks in Moab to prevent them from being damaged.

The agency says in a statement the tracks were collected after they came away from cliff edges naturally due to erosion. They are located near the Poison Spider Dinosaur Track Site and the Hells Revenge Jeep Trail.

Removing the tracks at the areas popular with visitors also protects them from potential vandalism, something workers at the Moab field office have dealt with several times over the years.

It is illegal under federal law for people to collect or damage fossilized track sites or dinosaur bones found on public lands.

 

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