UVU helps seniors continue learning

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A speaker at one of UVU Elder Quest's monthly luncheons. Elder Quest holds a bi-annual kickoff dinner where teachers speak about their class subject material for the semester. (Photo courtesy Elder Quest)
A speaker at one of UVU Elder Quest’s monthly luncheons. Elder Quest holds a bi-annual kickoff dinner where teachers speak about their class subject material for the semester. (Photo courtesy Elder Quest)

For adults and seniors who wish to continue learning beyond education week, Utah Valley University’s Elder Quest provides an opportunity to do so.

Utah Valley University is continuing its 22-year-old tradition of Elder Quest, a continuing education program for its older, nontraditional students.

Elder Quest is a 10-week education course hosted by Utah Valley University to aid seniors 55 and older in providing lifelong learning. According to the webpage, the mission of Elder Quest is to “provide member-driven programs which convey Utah Valley University’s fundamental role of providing educational opportunities to our community.”

Suzanne Hammond, the UVU Elder Quest publicity chair, said Elder Quest started in 1992 and has evolved over the years as Utah Valley has changed.

The head of the Community and Continuing Education Department wanted to have a lifelong learning organization for seniors in this area,” Hammond said. “A constitution, by-laws and a mission statement were formed, and a curriculum, teachers and charter members came together to form Elder Quest.”

Elder Quest offers a variety of courses from literature, American history, art, music, religious works and even a best of old movies class, all of which are taught by retired BYU professors.

Fees are $40 for the entire year, allowing students access to any of the classes available as well as the monthly current events luncheons, day trips and extended travel opportunities.

“It continues to provide member-driven programs that reinforce UVU Community and Continuing Education’s fundamental role of providing education opportunities for all senior learners in our community,” Hammond said. “The professors are high-quality educators who are giving back.”

UVU Elder Quest also hosts a yearly spring seminar and scholarship fundraiser for UVU nontraditional student scholarships.

“These scholarships have helped many nontraditional students over the years with tuition,” Hammond said.

The annual fall kickoff dinner is on Sept. 10, at 6 p.m. at the UVU Culinary Arts Building. The dinner is $15 and provides an opportunity to meet with some of the professors who teach the courses. Members should RSVP by Sept. 3 by calling 801-765-4696.

For more information about UVU Elder Quest or for any questions, visit www.uvu.edu/ce/elderquest, or contact Kay at 801-229-2573.  

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