Cougar Questions: What can students do to protect religious freedom in America and abroad?

384

Several high-profile cases regarding religious freedom will be decided by the Supreme Court this year. Shifting public opinion and new standards of morality threaten to impair or limit the right of individuals to worship according to their conscience and beliefs. With many members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints at BYU, what can students do to influence events around them and increase public support for the right of Americans to worship and believe as they choose? The Universe asked BYU students how they can increase support for religious freedom at home and abroad. Here’s how they responded.

"Always be grateful for the religious freedom that we do have. It's amazing that we can choose how we want to worship and go to church. We should be aware of those outside who don't have religious freedom, and we can write our political representatives." — Brooke Ann Henriks, English language, Las Vegas
“Always be grateful for the religious freedom that we do have. It’s amazing that we can choose how we want to worship and go to church. We should be aware of those outside who don’t have religious freedom, and we can write our political representatives.” — Brooke Ann Henriks, English language, Las Vegas
"By not being so pushy and allowing people to have their own opinions. We're all at different levels, even if we're of the same religion." — Clara Goodwin, broadcast journalism, Eagle, Idaho
“By not being so pushy and allowing people to have their own opinions. We’re all at different levels, even if we’re of the same religion.” — Clara Goodwin, broadcast journalism, Eagle, Idaho
"The biggest thing is to try to understand other people's religion's ideas. People can believe other things."—Cody Johnson, mathematics, Bountiful
“The biggest thing is to try to understand other people’s religion’s ideas. People can believe other things.” — Cody Johnson, mathematics, Bountiful
"I think being accepting toward other people's religions and realizing we're all different and come from different backgrounds — and that's OK." — Faith Kidder, communications disorders, Chandler, Ariz.
“I think being accepting toward other people’s religions and realizing we’re all different and come from different backgrounds — and that’s OK.” — Faith Kidder, communications disorders, Chandler, Ariz.
"I think we can promote religious freedom by being informed about other religions of the world. Being informed is the first step to accepting, which leads to religious freedom."— Jaron Thorkey, economics, Lindon
“I think we can promote religious freedom by being informed about other religions of the world. Being informed is the first step to accepting, which leads to religious freedom.” — Jaron Thorkey, economics, Lindon
"Just be accepting of other's beliefs. Don't judge people based on theirs, and be open to others."— Jessica Newman, wildlife and wildlands conservation, Syracuse, N.Y.
“Just be accepting of other’s beliefs. Don’t judge people based on theirs, and be open to others.” — Jessica Newman, wildlife and wildlands conservation, Syracuse, N.Y.
"Be careful in how they engage in religious discussion and how they portray their faith."— Michael Berdan, philosophy, Seattle
“Be careful in how they engage in religious discussion and how they portray their faith.” — Michael Berdan, philosophy, Seattle
"Living your life and being an example so that the people that know what you're doing is good and want to encourage that in others."— Tamara Oakey, pre-graphic design, Provo
“Living your life and being an example so that the people that know what you’re doing is good and want to encourage that in others.” — Tamara Oakey, pre-graphic design, Provo
"The first thing that comes to mind is something that the missionaries and the General Authorities are doing — use of social media to share our beliefs and to feel that others can do so as well."—Tommy Stoddard, Latin American studies, Fallon, Nev.
“The first thing that comes to mind is something that the missionaries and the General Authorities are doing — use of social media to share our beliefs and to feel that others can do so as well.” — Tommy Stoddard, Latin American studies, Fallon, Nev.
Print Friendly, PDF & Email