BYU clubs offer exercise options

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Husband and wife, Quinn and Whitney Winn, practice self-defense moves for the Jujitsu club. (Photo by Maddi Dayton.)
Husband and wife, Quinn and Whitney Winn, practice self-defense moves for the Jujitsu club. (Photo by Maddi Dayton.)

Whether students like to run, bike, play tennis or are interested in learning something new, BYU clubs offer opportunities for anyone looking to change up their workout routine.

From self-defense to triathlon training, a variety of opportunities are available for students who want to learn a new skill while staying active.

Jujitsu, also known as the gentle art, is a more traditional and less sport-oriented form of martial arts.

“We focus on philosophy and healing,” said Whitney Winn, member and former president of the Jujitsu club. “We do practical self-defense.”

The club is taught by Sensei Paul Sucher, who teaches the spiritual, cultural and even legal implications of the art.

“We have a saying,” Winn said. “It takes three things to be a martial artist. You have to know how to fight, you have to be a good person and a healthy person.”

Winn first discovered the club when she saw members practicing at the Wilkinson Student Center and asked what it was all about. Since becoming a member she said Jujitsu has brought peace into her life.

“Our club isn’t about becoming a better martial artist or a better fighter,” Winn said. “It’s about bettering yourself.”

This Jiujitsu club is similar to another campus club, the Seirenkai self-defense club.

“Seirenkai means integrity,” said Mark Wadsworth, founder and president of the Seirenkai self-defense club. “It means being truthful with others and being truthful with ourselves.”

Sensei Paul Sucher demonstrates a self-defense move on Quinn Winn. (Photo by Maddi Dayton.)
Sensei Paul Sucher demonstrates a self-defense move on Quinn Winn. (Photo by Maddi Dayton.)

The once-a-week meetings start off with warm ups, basic techniques and then learning prearranged forms of self-defense.

“Seirenkai is about competition with yourself,” said Wadsworth, a junior from Massachusettes. “If I did a good job, great. If I didn’t, what can I do better?”

Students don’t need any experience before joining the club.

“Just come to have fun, be safe and learn something new,” Wadsworth said.

The same goes for the running club.

“People come who like to run,” said Alex Lew, president of the club. “That’s all they need.”

The running club meets every weekday morning or evening at the Smith Fieldhouse and welcomes new members to make exercising more enjoyable.

“I always run,” Lew said. “And it’s more fun to run with people.”

Lew also recommends the triathlon club to anyone looking for more structured workouts.

Triathlon club members train every morning for one or two collegiate competitions every semester.

“I fell in love with competing,” said Colin Gill, former president and current member of the club. “It’s addicting. I waste all my money on triathlons.”

Students can find more information about BYU clubs at clubs.byu.edu.

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