Local band debuts album, announces release party at Velour

386

Provo first experienced the band The National Parks back in March, when they first appeared for a concert at the Riverwoods and quickly won over the crowd during the show. Since then, The National Parks have moved forward in their careers by touring in California, Nevada and Seattle over the summer, and gaining recognition on a national level.

Now that summer’s over, The National Parks have come back to Provo for classes and to celebrate the release of their debut album titled “Young.” The National Parks will also be performing at the Velour.

The National Parks band consists of BYU students (from left to right) Sydney Carling, Brady Parks and Paige Wagner. (Photo courtesy of Harper Anderson.)
The National Parks band consists of BYU students (from left to right) Sydney Carling, Brady Parks and Paige Wagner. (Photo courtesy of Harper Anderson.)

The band has faced some struggles in its thus far short life, the main one being reduced size of the band. When they recorded “Young,” they had six members. Now the band consists of three BYU students: Brady Parks, 23, a communications major from Parker, Colo., Sydney Carling, 22, a special education major from Kaysville, and Paige Wagner, 21, a violin performance major from Modesto, Calif.

Band cuts often cause problems in the music scene, but The National Parks haven’t let their loss of members slow them down. In fact, the band believes their new size makes their performances better.

“It pushes us, forces us to use more of our talents,” Carling said. “We’re more confident and we’re more trusting of each other.”

Only the three of them performed on this summer’s tour which allowed The National Parks to get more experience as a smaller band.

While The National Parks’ genre falls under Indie-folk/Americana, the band members also find unity in their common LDS religion.

The National Parks’ band manager Jacob Cutler said all the band members are “really committed to the LDS lifestyle, which isn’t conducive to the music industry. They don’t change their priorities for the music. (Their music’s) not gospel-oriented, but it is uplifting and it is positive.”

The National Parks will be performing at a special release party at the Velour for their new album, "Young." (Photo courtesy of Harper Anderson.)
The National Parks will be performing at a special release party at the Velour for their new album, “Young.” (Photo courtesy of Harper Anderson.)

The National Parks find joy in using their music to uplift the venue atmospheres and concertgoers alike.

“Music can either consume you or it can enhance our lives in a really positive way,” Wagner said.

Parks also agreed that the band finds motivation in knowing their music is special to their fans and can be used as a “force for good.”

The National Parks are coming to the Velour Saturday, Sept. 7 at 9 p.m. for $7. Fans that snag a pre-sale ticket or bring their football game ticket/ROC pass, can also get $3 off the band’s new album.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email