BYU Museum of Art‏ adds two new contemporary exhibits

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The BYU Museum of Art has brought attention to various forms of contemporary art with new and diverse exhibition openings in the past five years. In keeping up with this new trend, the MOA will be holding a grand opening for its last two new contemporary art exhibitions of the 2012-2013 school year.

The two new art exhibitions, “Edward Burtynsky: The Industrial Sublime” and “e.g.: Brian Patterson,” will be on display and open to the public Friday, April 5 from 7 to 10 p.m. for the museum’s last “First Friday” event of the school year. The day after the event, the popular exhibition “We Could Be Heroes: The Mythology of Heroes and Monsters in Contemporary Art” will be closing its doors.

Edward Burtynsky’s photography will be featured on the exhibition “Edward Burtynsky: The Industrial Sublime.” The Canadian photographer’s thought-provoking work in this exhibit focuses on industrial scenes from around the world. Some of the photography included in the exhibition will include scenes from Chinese factories to mines in Canada. The exhibition was organized by the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Weber State University and the University of Wyoming Art Museum.

The MOA will be holding a grand opening for its last two new contemporary art exhibitions of the school year. Some of the art featured will be by Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky. (Courtesy Edward Burtynsky)
The MOA will be holding a grand opening for its last two new contemporary art exhibitions of the school year. Some of the art featured will be by Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky. (Courtesy Edward Burtynsky)

Angelika Pagel, professor of art history at Weber State University, said she enjoys Burtynsky’s use of his camera to lure the viewer into a scene.

“Burtynsky uses rigorous composition and the exquisite exactitude possible with a large-format view camera to lure the viewer into the beauty of the landscapes,” Pagel said. “He examines more closely the uneasy subject of human incursions: mining, drilling, quarrying, industrial waste, tailings, reclamation, overproduction and over-population.”

Jeff Lambson, contemporary art curator for the MOA, described Burtynsky’s work as thought-provoking, making one think of the role each of us play in society and the world.

“Burtynsky’s work causes us to think about our own impact on the environment and the morality of our ever-expanding physical and social footprint,” Lambson said.

The second exhibition opening on the same night, “e.g.: Brian Patterson,” will feature Utah artist Brian Patterson’s video installation. Patterson was the recent recipient of the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art’s artist residency for his work and commitment to bringing attention and advancing his career in contemporary art.

In speaking about Patterson’s work, Lambson spoke on Patterson’s interest in using color and movement to draw the audience in.

“He combines the gestures of painting with video, drawing us into his meditative artworks,” Lambson said.

Both of the artists featured this month examine the processes some go through to keep daily life running. From natural rotations to different work environments, they demonstrate art in the mundane..

Sara Baird, a business management major from Arlington, Texas, shared her appreciation for the new contemporary art exhibitions the MOA is bringing to students.

“It’s great to see different kinds of art, especially here at BYU,” Baird said. “It really makes you appreciate all the talent that can be found in Utah and all the talent that comes to us from around the country.”

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