Electronic band Polytype releases debut album

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A new electronic band in Provo is set to release its debut album on Friday.

The band, Polytype (formerly known as Soft Science), has been working on the album, “Basic//Complex,” for the past year and a half and is excited to finally share it with fans.

Lead singer Mason Porter said the band hopes to bring a unique voice and sound to the Provo music scene as one of the first electronic bands to hit the area.

Polytype is releasing a new album with a show at Velour Live Music Gallery. (Photo courtesy Arash Armin)

With an album full of repeating themes of shapes, colors and deserts, Porter said the strategy behind the record was focused more on making its overall sound uniquely identifiable rather than its lyrical content.

“When we set out at the beginning, we knew we wanted to make music that nobody else in Provo was making, and I think we did that,” Porter said.

Porter said the creation of the album was a long learning process for every member of the group as they honed and perfected their unique sound.

“The album took about a year to create, and the reason it took so long was because we were learning to play electronic music throughout the process,” Porter said. “We would write songs and rewrite them, and (it) took about seven months before we even got into the studio.”

Guitarist Scott Haslam echoed Porter’s hopes of introducing the electronic genre to new fans in Provo.

“Electronic music is getting pretty big on the national and international scenes,” Haslam said. “But it hasn’t really hit the Provo scene yet, so we’re hoping this will open doors for more people to explore the genre — both as fans and musicians.”

To promote the album’s release, Polytype will be hosting an album release show at Velour on Friday, Feb. 1 at 8:00 p.m., with openers Lake Island and Mideau. Physical copies of the album will be on sale at the concert.

Jason Gibby, who plays synthesizers and samplers in the band, said fans can expect an exciting show on Friday night.

“We want it to be an out-of-the-ordinary show for everyone who comes, so we want to keep things really visually exciting,” Gibby said. “There are going to be a few surprises throughout the night, for sure.”

Like his bandmates, Gibby said he hopes the band’s album will inspire others to try their hand at creating electronic music.

“Electronic music is really exciting to me,” Gibby said. “It’s so accessible, which may seem counter-intuitive. All the gadgets and technology associated with it may seem intimidating at first, but any kid with a computer has the ability to make really interesting electronic music all on their own.”

Kaneischa Johnson, public relations director at Velour Live Music Gallery, said she thinks the album will have a big impact on local music’s current playing field.

“From our perspective, the album is really groundbreaking — not only on a local level, but on a national level as well,” Johnson said. “We’ve been longtime supporters of Polytype, so to see the culmination of all their work is something everyone should be really excited about.”

Josh Allan, a fan of the band, said he’s looking forward to seeing them play their album live.

“They’ve released a bunch of teasers the past few weeks, and it’s gotten me really pumped for the concert,” Allan said. “They’re so new and different from every other local band that it won’t just be a run-of-the-mill show.”

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