BYU students shocked by Brick Oven's liquor license

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THE BRICK OVEN LOCATION NEAR BYU CAMPUS IN PROVO IS NOT PLANNING ON APPLYING FOR A LIQUOR LICENSE. WHILE SOME LOCATIONS ARE APPLYING FOR A LIQUOR LICENSE, THE LOCATION THAT IS ASSOCIATED WITH BYU IN THIS ARTICLE IS NOT AMONG THEM. – Editor’s note. 

The Brick Oven restaurant’s obtaining of a liquor license in Layton leaves BYU students surprised and unsettled.

Brick Oven pizza has had a long relationship with BYU students. Founded by an LDS family, the first restaurant opened in 1956 across the street from BYU as “Heaps A Pizza,” and it remains the iconic dinner trip for visiting BYU families and friends.

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The Brick Oven restaurant in Layton recently obtained a liquor license.
This LDS-visited restaurant has successfully obtained a liquor license for the Layton location. Layton’s city council recently approved the application for Dain Black of Brick Oven for a liquor license.

This is the first location to serve alcohol; whether the other locations will choose to follow is not yet known.

While the restaurant’s website does not mention anything about the Church, or the religious background of the restaurant, several locals said they felt that Brick Oven has a close relationship with LDS people.

Breezy Osborn, a therapeutic recreation major from Sandy, opposes the addition of liquor to the restaurant.

“When I think of Brick Oven, I think of BYU,” Osborn said. “We always eat there as a family. Layton is the first Brick Oven to get the license, and I feel that it will catch on to the other locations and come back to BYU.”

Savannah Cluff, from Long Beach California added her opinion. ” I don’t think it will hurt the image of BYU itself, but the purchase won’t make a huge profit for [the restaurant] — it’s Utah,” Cluff said.

Other BYU students agreed. They said the addition of alcohol to a restaurant that has been alcohol-free for over 50 years seems like a weak move. The restaurant is closely related to LDS people, and this addition seems like a response to peer pressure.

Cluff added that while she does not support the use of alcohol, she won’t boycott the restaurant.

“I think it’s pointless, but the purchase is not for me to say,” Cluff said. “If it was my restaurant, I wouldn’t have given in to the trend of supplying alcohol, but it’s [the owner’s] moral agency; they can choose for themselves.”

Osborn said she felt it was an issue of personal interest versus personal belief.

“Our beliefs do not support the drinking or use of alcohol. Going against beliefs to make more money is nothing respectable,” Osborn said.

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