Fresh breath a concern for students

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    By KATIE PARKER

    Many BYU students use the Fresh Breath Clinic to enhance their dating.

    “When students come here seeking treatments, dating and relationships are the unspoken reason they come,” said Kris Baldwin, a dental hygienist running the clinic under the direction of Dr. Phillip C. Hall, D.D.S.

    Although no increase in respondents is noticed around Valentine’s Day, the majority of people who ask about treatment are students, Baldwin said.

    Among the students who come, the number of males and females is equal, she said.

    “It is very common for young wives to send their new husbands,” Baldwin said.

    Utah Orthodontic Care uses Dr. Hall’s dental facilities every Monday.

    “More than two people come in each time we are here asking about the fresh breath treatments,” said Angie Pearson, the patient coordinator for Utah Orthodontic Care.

    Fresh breath seems to be a big issue among BYU students and dating.

    Chewing gum is necessity on a date, said Jim Jeffries, 21, a sophomore from Valencia, Calif., majoring in human biology.

    “No one wants to go out with a dog-breath guy,” Jeffries said.

    Jeffries says he chews an average of three pieces of gum on every date: one at the beginning, one after dinner and another towards the end.

    Jeffries brushes and flosses his teeth regularly and has not had a problem with bad breath.

    “Fresh breath is more important than cologne,” he said.

    However, gum and breath mints only covers up the sulfate bonds which cause bad breath, Baldwin said.

    “Oxyfresh products from the clinic, containing chlorine dioxide, break those sulfate bonds and treats those problem areas,” Baldwin said.

    The most common products used are the toothpaste, mouthwash and breath mints, she said.

    “During the first visit, we test areas with a halimeter, which measures parts per billion,” she said. The readings are taken from the mouth, nasal tract, stomach and throat.

    If problems exist then products are advised, Baldwin said.

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