Highlights from BYU colleges

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Marriott School of Business

  • BYU alumni and twin sisters Aubri Robinson and Amber Corkin have started a business together after graduating in 2013. The DIY Lighthouse is a website with tutorials on a variety of projects, including baby showers, budget-friendly decor, holiday recipes and more. The two hope to inspire others with creativity, while keeping in touch with each other.

    Aubri Robinson (left) and Amber Corkin are BYU alumni and twin sisters who have created a business to inspire creativity. (Marriott School of Business)

College of Humanities

  • Julie Allen, BYU professor of comparative arts and letters, published a book titled “Danish but Not Lutheran: The Impact of Mormonism on Danish Cultural Identity, 1850-1920.” The book explores Danish views of Mormonism after the Constitutional Act of Denmark established religious freedom. Until 1949, all Danes were required to be Lutheran, which was the state religion at the time. Allen’s book examines the cultural effects of Danish Mormons.

    BYU professor of comparative arts and letters Julie Allen published a book about Mormonism and Danish culture earlier this year. (College of Humanities)

College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences

  • BYU associate professor of ancient scripture Matthew Grey is the area supervisor of an archaeological excavation in the ancient Jewish village Huqoq. He spent summer 2017 accompanied by five BYU students working through the BYU Jerusalem Center for Near Eastern Studies. The group, in coalition with colleagues from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Baylor University and the University of Toronto, found rare biblical depictions on an ancient synagogue mosaic — specifically, a variation of the story of Jonah.
    BYU participants in the 2017 excavations at Huqoq. Back row (from left to right): Hannah Lambert, Matthew Grey and Masen Willamson; front row: Nathan Astel, Amanda Buessecker, Bryan Bozung (BYU alum) and Tyler Harris. (Credit: Jim Haberman)

College of Fine Arts and Communications

  • BYU communications professor Kevin John, along with colleagues from the University of Utah conducted an eye-tracking study to find better ways to promote skin self-examination. The study shows that it may be more effective for patients to look at illustrations of cancerous moles, than to look at photographs in identifying atypical moles. John hopes these findings will help to develop more effective training guidelines for skin self-examination.

    Savanna Richardson/BYU
    BYU communications professor Kevin John used eye-tracking technology to determine a more effective way of identifying problematic moles. (BYU News)

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