Highlights from BYU colleges

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BYU physicist, engineer and Ph.D. student crack code to produce a dictionary of atomic structures. (BYU News).

College of Family, Home and Social Sciences

  • BYU neuroscience associate professor Jonathan Wisco founded the Anatomy Academy, a program designed to help teach children about healthy living. Wisco, who’s concerned about child obesity in America, sends BYU students to teach fifth and sixth graders how to take care of themselves. They are taught how to measure the amount of sugar in food and how the heart and blood cells work. They use real cow hearts and lungs to show how the organs function.

    Elisa T. Adamson
    Jonathan Wisco founded the Anatomy Academy program to teach youths about healthy living. (BYU College of Life Sciences)

Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology

  • BYU researchers made a major breakthrough by being the first to make microfluidic devices using a 3-D printer. The device is a tiny chip, less than 100 micrometers, that sorts out small structures like cells and disease biomarkers in samples like blood. BYU electrical engineering professor Greg Nordin and BYU chemistry professor Adam Woolley built a high resolution 3-D printer and used a custom-made resin to create the chip. Bryce Bickham, a BYU undergraduate who just finished his freshman year, also contributed to the research by finding the resin material.

    BYU researchers are the first to create a 3-D printer that prints a microfluidic device. (BYU News)

David O. McKay School of Education

  • Physical education professor Carol Wilkinson spent 11 years writing “The Field Is White: Harvest in the Three Counties of England.” The book documents the stories of early English converts from Gloucestershire, Herefordshire and Worcestershire. It also includes the works of Wilford Woodruff and other missionaries from when they taught the United Brethren and other converts. Wilkinson wrote the book with Paul Peterson, the department chair of Church History and Doctrine, and Cynthia Doxey Green.

    Carol Wilkinson spent 11 years writing “The Field Is White: Harvest in the Three Counties of England.” (David O. McKay School of Education)
  • The annual Arts Express Summer Conference for Elementary Educators, held in June, taught hundreds of parents, administrators and teachers from around the state about the arts. Sylvia Vardell and Janet Wong, coauthors of “The Poetry Friday Anthology” series, spoke at the conference about poetry and its benefits. The conference provided educators with hands-on learning experiences in incorporating the arts into their curriculum.

    The annual Arts Express Summer Conference for Elementary Educators taught new ideas about the arts to hundreds who attended. (David O. McKay School of Education)

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences

  • BYU doctoral student Conrad Rosenbrock, engineering professor Eric Homer and physics professor Gus Hart created a way to produce a “dictionary” of atomic structures. The team uses machine learning, a process that predicts trends in data by using computer algorithms. The information it provides helps connect the dots between a boundary and a property and explains the “why” and “how” of the material makeup. Their goal is to make developing materials easier and more efficient.

    BYU engineering professor Eric Homer, BYU doctoral student Conrad Rosenbrock and physics professor Gus Hart used machine learning and algorithms to produce a dictionary of atomic structures. (BYU News)

J. Reuben Clark Law School

  • Gayla Sorenson, BYU Law School dean of admissions, spoke about advocacy in the devotional address on Aug. 8. Sorenson encouraged listeners to become advocates for others and gave three guidelines for becoming an advocate: First, recognize we are called to be advocates; second, determine what key traits effective advocates have; and third, contemplate who and what to advocate for.

    Gayla Sorenson delivered the BYU Devotional address on Aug. 8. (BYU Event Calendar)
  • BYU Law professor Aaron Nielson was announced as a new public member for the Administrative Conference of the United States on Aug. 4. He is one of 101 total voting members, who have backgrounds as senior federal officials, scholars, lawyers and others. The organization is an independent federal agency that offers expert advice to federal agencies, the U.S. Congress and the U.S. president.

    BYU Law professor Aaron Nielson was announced as a new public member for The Administrative Conference of the United States. (BYU Law)

Library

  • The Creativity, Innovation and Design Studio is currently accepting applications for the fall until Tuesday, Aug. 15. The studio is a teaching space in the Harold B. Lee Library dedicated giving students a space for fostering creative thinking and problem-solving. Students from all majors and backgrounds are invited to collaborate on solutions to today’s societal issues.

    The Creativity, Innovation and Design Studio is a teaching space in the library dedicated to giving students a space to find solutions to societal problems. (Harold B. Lee Library)
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