Highlights from BYU colleges

Family Home and Social Sciences

  • Sociology professor Renata Forste explained Americans tend to devalue housework — or at least value it less than paid labor — because it’s women’s work and therefore not as difficult. Forste explained the difficulty of housework and its importance in the Virginia F. Cutler 2017 lecture.

    Renata Forste explains how Americans devalue housework compared to paid labor. (College of Family, Home and Social Sciences)
  • BYU sociology student Marissa Getts and industrial design student Alison Brand spoke about the importance of helping children develop empathy in a BYU TED talk. Getts and Brand provided ideas for ways to help parents foster empathy in their children to better overcome selfishness. The list of suggestions included encouraging children to meet new people and have new, foreign experiences; encouraging exploratory action; and providing positive validation wherever possible.
  • BYU political science professor Earl Fry said Utah would rank as the world’s 53rd largest economy if the U.S. states were nations in a Deseret News op-ed. The U.S. map he created labels the states with the names of countries whose economies are close to the states’ in size. Utah is labeled as “Iraq” because Utah produced an amount of goods and services similar to what Iraq produced in 2016.

    Earl Fry ranks Utah as world’s 53rd largest economy if U.S. states were countries. (College of Family, Home and Social Sciences)

David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies

  • BYU’s Model UN team continued its 14-year streak of winning outstanding delegation, the National Model United Nations’ highest team designation. This year, around 50 BYU students represented Pakistan and Finland in the four-day competition while going up against 197 other teams. Students prepare for the competition two semesters in advance in the program by learning about public speaking, international affairs, conflict resolution and more.

    BYU won the highest Model UN award 14 years straight. (BYU Magazine)

Marriott School of Management

  • Romney Institute associate professor Chris Silvia and University of Kansas professor Rachel Krause created a simulation to research which government policies most influence consumers to buy battery-powered electric vehicles instead of traditional cars. Silvia and Krause found the highest amount of people purchase electric cars when a mix of three policies — buying a city fleet of battery-powered electric vehicles, offering incentives to lower the price of electric vehicles and installing public charging stations — was implemented.

    Romney Institute associate professor Chris Silvia found the highest amount of people purchase electric cars when a mix of three government policies was implemented. (Marriott School of Management)
  • Professor Brad Agle has been named president of the International Association for Business and Society. Agle has been a member of the Romney Institute of Public Management since 2009. His work has been featured in outlets like the Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post. He has previously served as assistant conference chair, conference chair and president-elect.
    Brad Agle will serve as the IABS President. (Marriott School of Management).

David O. McKay School of Education

  • Leanna Fry Balci, instructional design librarian and instructional psychology and technology doctoral student, has developed a new program known as Y-Search. Y-Search was designed to change the way first-year students learn and write in their writing classes, using teaching modules and interactive elements. The five Y-Search modules include background research, topic development, search strategies, source evaluation and critical reading. Each module features two short videos to help students develop their writing skills. The program took four months to develop and Balci plans to expand the program to more students.

    Leanna Fry Balci developed a writing program for first-year writing students called Y-Search. (BYU Library)

College of Fine Arts and Communications

BYU ARTS Creative season posters won top design awards at three prestigious competitions. (College of Fine Arts and Communications)
  • Season posters for BYU ARTS Creative won the Copper Ingot Award for the third year in a row and a Grand Gold Award. The Copper Ingot Award is presented to the top 10 best pieces, and the Grand Gold Award is given to 16 entries at the national level. The Council for Advancement and Support of Education Circle of Excellence Awards awarded the Grand Gold Award. Sue Cunningham, president and CEO of the organization, said the 2017 competition was the most competitive one ever, with over 3,364 entries and only 366 awards given. The winning posters will featured in the September/October issue of Communications Arts magazine.

J. Reuben Clark Law School

  • BYU Law and the Federal Bar Association launched the Civics, Law, and Leadership Youth Camp, held at BYU July 31 – August 4. The goal of the camp was to inspire and facilitate informed and civil discourse amongst more than 70 high school students from over 20 states and different backgrounds. The camp invited guest speakers and included an interactive day at the Utah Federal Courthouse, as well as hands-on learning experiences for youths who are interested in civics, leadership and law.
  • BYU Law graduates J. Frederic Voros Jr. and Stephen Roth have retired from the Utah Court of Appeals. Roth came back to BYU after flunking out his first semester and four years after enlisting in the Marine Corps. Roth was appointed to the 3rd District Court bench in 2002 by Gov. Mike Leavitt and to the Court of Appeals in 2010 by Gov. Gary Herbert. Voros graduated from BYU’s J. Reuben Clark Law School in 1978. He spent 18 years working for the Utah Attorney General’s Office serving as chief of the criminal appeals division for about half that time, until he was appointed to the Court of Appeals.
  • BYU Law grad and Amicus Communications president Emily Hardman presented the results of an Amicus survey. The results show millennials generally deem religious freedom as being important, but don’t quite understand what it means. The survey also showed millennials consider themselves religious, but not belonging to a particular religious group. And 58 percent of millennials agreed that “religion is personal and should not play a significant role in society,” according to the survey.
Emily Hardman finds in her study that millennials still value religious freedom but don’t fully understand what it means. (BYU Law)

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